All posts tagged: women in events

In Conversation With Komal Gandhi: On Experiential Learning, Leadership Development and More

Last month I had a chance to meet with Komal Gandhi, an L&D Professional and Experiential Facilitator. An hour-long conversation at a Starbucks resulted in some fascinating insights on leadership development, organisational effectiveness and the direction in which professional learning is headed. Read on to find out how Komal is working on her passion and how experiential learning programs are finding great appeal in organisations across industries. The Start Of An Exciting Journey Komal, an alumna of MDI Gurgaon and Lady Shri Ram College, first started out in this field in 2004 in Delhi. It all began with outdoor and adventure-based learning. In 2012, she started Management by Arts in Mumbai. “I want to help businesses enhance the performance of their employees through arts-based learning solutions,” she says. Intrigued by her approach, I ask her how does art mix with business. “It’s about creativity and innovation. Management by Arts is a collaborative platform that brings together L&D and organisational development experts, filmmakers, artists and facilitators together to explore managerial learning through various art forms. My …

Rewards and Incentives for Women at the Workplace

This piece, written by one of our close friends, seeks to understand what it is like being a woman attendee in events and programs, that are almost always designed, perhaps unconsciously, for men. Rewards Only for Men “I don’t want to outperform ever” I am sure that’s not the response organizations expect from their top performers. But if a top performer happens to be a woman, it might not be that surprising. “I was rewarded for my performance once with a trip to Thailand. I had a horrible time.” She said in a tone of absolute disappointment and disgust. Even though the location was selected and the schedule was designed with a clear intent to ‘reward employees’, it didn’t feel like a reward to her. The trip included a series of events designed for high testosterone misogynistic men – strip clubs, massages with a happy ending and ‘special’ shows. She was the only woman in a group of almost 70 men, mainly sales and marketing teams including her seniors. Even they were uncomfortable with her …